Tag Archives: Moderation

Screen Suggestions for Students

Screen Suggestions for Students

Let your moderation be known unto all men. The Lord is at hand.

Philippians 4:5

Screen suggestions for students, well, perhaps more for the parents of students.  All of us have noticed the exponential leap of digital devices creeping into our lives.  I like the new devices.  The digital things, screens of all sizes, and new tech can be terrific.  But at some point, we can have too much of a good thing.

Paul was telling the believers at Philippi that moderation should clearly be part of their lives.  We can go overboard – even with good things.  Balance is needed in every area of the Christian life.  If we are not careful the stuff we have will control us!

Here are some ideas to help moderate the tech stuff of life:

  1. Ensure your child gets a full night of rest, have a media basket for all the cell phones and connected devices to rest at night.  The temptation to communicate, surf, and feed possible addictions become less when a device is not accessible at night.  Even if music or other things are used on a device to help a child go to sleep, it seems like a short-sighted fix.  We should avoid being dependent on anything or anyone other than Jesus and His Word.
  2. Increase your child’s GPA; get rid of the smart phone.  With an increase of smart device use, the need for learning and knowing stuff for yourself tends to decrease.  A study came out recently suggesting that students learn better from print on paper books.  Even the talented people who create these devices and software do not allow their kids to have much screen time.  They buy their kids printed books.
  3. Work on social skills.  When children are visiting your home, have a phone basket for the phones to go in.  Have you noticed that with all the social media that people are actually less social in real life settings?
  4. Teach your children the sacredness of worship by instructing them to not play on devices while at the church building.  Turn them off.  A print Bible has less possible distractions than a digital one.
  5. Some have gone back to flip phones or what I call “dumb phones.”  These phones revert back to the whole reason for a phone to begin with – calling and texting.  It is good for children to know how to use devices without letting those devices control them.
  6. We do allow our kids to have “tablet time” but it is limited with time increments and we do not only monitor, but we know all of the programs that we have installed on those devices.  Parents cannot be too careful in guiding their children to enable and equip them for making right decisions.
  7. Much of these principles can be applied to video games and screens of any size as well.

I hope these suggestions will help you find a healthy balance.  Do you have several others?  Post them here and they may be re-posted for others to see…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Too Much of a Good Thing

Too Much of a Good Thing

Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it.  Proverbs 25:16

Hundreds, perhaps thousands of books have been written about dieting.  Eat this.  Do not eat that.  Stick with Carbs.  Avoid carbs.  Go protein.  No meat.  No bread.  No sugar.  Less starch.  Natural this.  Natural that.

In an effort, not to give medical advice but Bible advice, please note the above verse.  Finding something sweet to eat is ok, but too much of a good thing can cause pain, hurt, and suffering later.  I love Snickers bars, but man cannot live by Snickers bars alone.  It is possible to get too much of a good thing!

The best principle for what and how we eat, what we possess, and how we behave is the word “moderation.”  Having too much of something, even something good, can actually affect the quality of living in a negative way.

Moderation is a term that is unfamiliar to American culture today.  We live in a day of excess.  Excess food. Excess weight.  Excess games.  Excess work.  Excessive riches.  Excessive expectations.  People act as if they deserve the best, they deserve it now, and not many are willing to pay the true price in the present.  That is why many people file bankruptcy and rack up tremendous amounts of credit card debt trying to live a “good life.”  Most are unfamiliar with moderation and a terrible example of this is the national average of debt for the Federal Government per US taxpayer.  It is and astonishing….. $154,161!  (Forbes.com)

Words related to the term “moderation” include:  restraint, self-control, temperance, and balance.  Do these words characterize your life?  How about your relationship?  Finances?  Or even eating candy bars?  Here are three ways “Moderation” can help you today:

  • Moderation Shows –Dependence upon God. When we are not so focused on amassing “stuff” we demonstrate and evident dependence on God.  When we are able to be balanced and not excessive we show that God is able to provide, meet needs, and solve the issues we face.  Having nice things is terrific, but it is not the goal for living the Christian life.  The goal is to be more like Jesus.
  • Moderation Proves – Contentment in the non-tangibles of life. As humans we tend to place value on rare items such as gold, silver, or precious stones.  Bling and glamour are attractive to the human nature.  A person living in moderation may have gold, silver, or precious stones, but does not find these items inherently valuable in themselves.  Value in God’s economy is rooted in faith, hope, and love.  Things that you cannot touch or even hold can actually have greater value than material things.  I like the old saying : “Some people love things and use people; but we really should use things to love people.”

Peace, joy, and hope are worth more than all the things money can buy.  Contentment, fulfillment, and faith cannot be bought but can be uncovered and enjoyed by the person living with a spirit of moderation.  Fighting, longing, and working to achieve excess can actually cause the intangibles to flee away.  Some people own so much stuff, their stuff actually owns them.  Ie.  Some cannot get away from the 2 boats, 5 cars, or 3 retreat cabins and have to spend their time maintaining their stuff.  Immoderate living can be controlling.

  • Moderation Provides – Satisfaction in Spiritual, Emotional, Relational, and Physical ways. The whole person (body, soul, spirit) benefits from the perspective of moderation.  A sigh of relief, a spirit at ease, and a mind at rest are possible – with contentment.

The solution to moderation is truly finding our very contentment, meaning, purpose, and value in Jesus.  It is Jesus – Who is the cause of true satisfaction in living.

How are you doing with moderation?  Do you see balance in your eating and exercise?  Do you see temperance in how you relate to other people?  Are you restrained in finances for earthly things?  Thank the Lord for “good things” while keeping in mind that it is possible to have too much of a good thing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media Moderation

Media Moderation

And every man that striveth for the mastery is temperate in all things. Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible.  I Corinthians 9:25

Most people have some form of connection to the internet and social media today.  With mobile phones, and tablets of all kinds, we are living in a wirelessly connected world.  How does it affect the human brain and body?  How does the constant connections with other “digital people” in a virtual world affects us and our children?

Dr. Keith Ablow, a secular news commentator with articles frequently posted on Fox writes:  “For some time now, I have noted that young people— including adolescents, teenagers and those in their 20s— are disconnected from the reality of their own existences. Facebook, Twitter, Tinder and the like have made them think of themselves as mini-reality-TV versions of themselves. Too many of them see their lives as a series of flickering photos or quick videos. They need constant doses of admiration and constant confirmation of their tenuous existence, which come in the form of Facebook “likes” and Twitter “retweets.”

This substitution of media for real meaning has not only been shown to weaken their self-esteem and their ability to sustain themselves through adversity, but it can cheapen the value they assign to life in general— including their own lives. If all the world is a stage of pixels, and young people see themselves as their tweets and Snapchat photos, then taking a fist-full of pills could seem like no more than the equivalent of shutting down a Facebook account or turning off an iPhone.  Call it, “Suicide by Social Media.””

Dr. Ablow is on to something.

Recently our family eye doctor told us there has been an uptick of children getting glasses sooner than normal.  Their eyes are adjusting differently than generations past because they are so accustomed to holding a screen inches from their eyes.  We are a new society focused primarily on the next image on our little screens.

“Moderation” is a good word for diet and eating, but also for our media consumption.

1 Corinthians 9:25 is a terrific verse to know and apply to our everyday lives.  “And every man that striveth for the mastery is temperate in all things. Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptible.”

If the athlete is “training for the mastery” he is limiting the outside distractions that would hinder him from becoming a master as his particular sport.  This is why we hear of sensational athletes choosing one sport over another sport.  It is so they can become a professional at one sport and be the best they can be at it.  One may decline football so he can become better at basketball.

The Lord gives us the answer here concerning the amount of time and attention we give to social media.  While we are social creatures, our primary reason for being alive today is to glorify the Lord and to make Him known.  We are to serve Him and tell others about Him.  One good use of social media is to tell others the Gospel.

However, the teenager and adult whose nerves are pulsating with heart beating, waiting for the next “like” or “friend” have their spiritual and emotional heart in the wrong place.  As Christians we find our fulfillment in Jesus; both emotionally and spiritually.

Here are some ideas to help:

  • Control social media; do not let social media control you. Sometimes the things we love most take the most time.  Give more time to the Lord.
  • Embrace face to face relationships and value the person in front of you more than a screen. Turn off the screen, look someone in the eye.  Open your mouth and say something.  Give a moment for a response and listen with your ears. Repeat.  I have to practice this too!
  • Turn off the device, tv, or cell phone at night. Some choose to not have the source of temptation close to them, to help them get away from it for a bit.  This is a good way to “rest the nerves” if you are inclined to wait for the next social endorsement.
  • Children and teens should not have access at night. Help your teens with this.  Avoid allowing them to take a phone or computer in their room at night.  Many tweens and teens with cell phones report a lack of sleep primarily caused by tapping on a screen most of the night.  Most trouble today with teens is caused or contributed to by unrestrained social media.  Set limits for your kids.
  • Moderation goes a long way. Some mothers gush and blush in front of face-book while their child is crying or their attention.  Some dads sit or snooze in front of a screen while there kids need time with him.  Set limits for yourself too.
  • Know the score. Know who your kids are talking to.  It happens too often; a young person runs off with a stranger they met on social media and end up abused or dead.  I read about it happening again last week.  Know and keep access to both the device and the accounts of your kids and your spouse.  Yes, spouses should share this information.

Always know: Our value does not come from how many “likes”, “friends” or “connections” we make.   Colossians 2:10 is such a helpful verse that builds our esteem and value:  “And ye are complete in him, which is the head of all principality and power.”

We are valuable to God because we are created in His image.  Jesus loves you.

When we turn to social media for emotional satisfaction, in a way, we are creating false idols that we hope will meet our needs.  Our spiritual and emotional needs are only truly met in Jesus.  “Moderation” is a good for diet and eating, but also for our media consumption.

How is your media moderation today?  Too much?  Need to control it better?

Be bold to make the recommended adjustments in your lifestyle.

Glorify the Lord with how you utilize social media this week.