Tag Archives: praying

Don’t Be Like Your Dog

Don’t Be Like Your Dog

“A little lad of six was invited out to lunch in a neighbor’s home. As soon as all were seated at the table the food was served. The little boy was puzzled, and, with a child’s frankness, asked, “Don’t you say a prayer before you eat?” The host was uncomfortable, and mumbled, “No, we don’t take time for that.” The lad thought silently for a while, and said, “You’re just like my dog! You start right in.””

Don’t be like your dog on Thanksgiving.  Remember to give thanks to the Lord.

One of my favorite things to do each holiday season is to watch Charlie Brown and his talented dog, Snoopy.  One of the best yearly reminders of God’s blessing to early America can be seen in Charles Schultz’ rendition of the Pilgrims coming over on the Mayflower, meeting Chief Massasoit and Squanto and sitting down to dinner and giving thanks to God for surviving the brutal and deadly winters they were unprepared for.  With little food, a majority of the settlers buried, and with great uncertainty facing the future, they stopped everything to praise and thank the Lord.

It has been said that being truly “thankful” involves “giving.”  After all, the word Thanksgiving is a compound word; and both “Thanks” and Giving” are words rich with meaning.  Grateful people are happy people.  Have you ever seen a complaining, grumbling person?  Sure.  Are they happy?  No.  We are most happy when we have thankful attitudes, grateful words, and gracious actions.  If you are consistently giving praise and thanks to the Lord, you will be less likely to be critical, self absorbed, and feeling negative about life.

We need to be like the Apostle Paul who said in 1 Thessalonians 5:18, “In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you.”  The early Christians living in the city of Thessalonica were challenged and encouraged to give thanks in everything in life.  Every life stage.  Every circumstance.  Every weather event.  Every electoral cycle.  Every season of life.  Every start to the week.  In.  Everything.  Give.  Thanks.

Happy Thanksgiving!  Thank-you for reading these devotionals.  I am grateful for each reader and pray that these postings will be a help to you.

 

 

 

 

 

(Snoopy rendition by Charles Schulz, from internet search)

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Prayer Changes Us

Prayer Changes Us

If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and it shall be done unto you.  John 15:7

“A fifth grade boy who had heard a sermon on persistence in prayer was praying by himself in his room one night. As his dad passed his door, he heard the boy praying over and over again, “Tokyo, Tokyo, Tokyo.” The next day, the dad asked his son what he was doing. The boy replied that he had given the wrong answer on a test for the capital of Mexico, and he was praying that Tokyo would become the capital of Mexico.”

Some people pray trying to “fix” a situation or change the way things are.  What if prayer changed us more than the situation?  It is very possible. Observe.

  1. When we pray the will or Word of God, we are “in tune” with God’s plan.
  2. When we pray for the will of God, we are asking for more than merely what we think is best.
  3. When we pray in the will of God, we are demonstrating faith and confidence that “His way is best.”
  4. When we pray the Word of God, we are allowing His presence in us to be more evident.
  5. When we pray in God’s will, we are able to rest, have peace, and totally rely on His working it out. All the while, the practice of prayer is also changing us.

While pray does “change things” – it can also change us!

 

 

 

 

 

Making Time to Pray

Making Time to Pray

But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.                   1 Peter 4:7

When faced with a big decision or fraught with a new diagnosis, we can start to pray like we never prayed before.  But why wait to pray?  There is much to pray for every day.

Between work and play – we need to make time to pray.

In the verse above, the word “sober” has to do with clear thinking.  Then the word “watch” is used and says we are to “watch unto prayer.”  It means to abstain from wine.  Abstaining from alcohol helps keep the mind clear.  It is a word that when applied indicates having clear attention.  While alcohol clouds the mind, we must be clear headed to pay attention to prayer. The Lord wants us to have a clear mind and level-headed thinking so we can give time to praying.

Most American Christians are too distracted to make time to pray.  For example:

Recode.net says American spend 5 hours watching TV every day. In comparison:  Media and Methods reports the average American spends only five hours per year reading books.”

The A.C. Nielson Co says that “TV viewing began to rise in the 1960’s. It is approximately the same point in time that the Standard Achievement Test scores began to decline. This time frame is significant because the first generation to cut its teeth on TV began taking SATs in the early 1960’s.

Spin.com says Americans listen to 4 hours of music each day.

In many ways, we are “entertained out of our minds!”  Our minds are “clouded- full of entertainment.”  No wonder we do not take the time to pray like we should.  The stats above do not even factor small screen time (cellphones, tablets, etc).

Be sure to “Watch” unto prayer today.  Decisive action and a definite plan to pause and pray can be taken in your life today.

Make some time to pray – today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Initiative of Missions

The Initiative of Missions

Then said Jesus to them again, Peace be unto you: as my Father hath sent me, even so send I you.  John 20:21

The tomb was empty.  The disciples were hiding in the Upper Room.  Jesus shows up.  He appears in the middle of the room even with all the doors and windows of the Upper Room closed.  The resurrected Savoir speaks about peace, the peace of God.  Then He directs the attention of the mesmerized disciples to the thought that just as the Father sent Jesus on a mission of rescue, Jesus was now sending His disciples.  He then enables them with the filling of the Holy Spirit.  Later in Acts 1 they are empowered by His Spirit.  Jesus initiates the call to participate in missions.

As disciples of Jesus, we are called with the same calling.  We are to go into this world and preach the Gospel.  While not everyone will be in ministry “vocationally” we are all in the ministry of giving out the Gospel.  You can help your church witness by giving out Gospel tracts and inviting people to church.  Concerning missions; Praying, giving and going are all important aspects.  You may be involved in praying and giving which then provides for those who actually go into vocational missions.  It could be that the Lord calls you to go into missions.

Three thoughts about missions:

Missions is Intentional.  Churches are not planted on accident.  When the disciples went about the world 2000 years ago, they preached, saw people saved, discipled, baptized and local churches formed.  Church planting is the primary goal of missions.  In order to start a church, evangelism and discipleship must take place.  It is good to note that discipleship always starts with evangelism.  It is impossible to truly have one without the other.  We are to “make disciples.”  This is very intentional when planting the seed of the Gospel and watering with the Word.

Missions is an Investment.  Speaking of “grace giving” or “faith promise missions giving” Paul says in Philippians 4:17: “Not because I desire a gift: but I desire fruit that may abound to your account.”  The believers in the church at Philippi were consistent in giving finances to Paul and his mission work.  When a soul was saved, a convert discipled, and a church established, that was fruit added to the account of the believers.  Their financial investment paid off in spiritual dividends.

Missions is Invitational.  The invitation is open to “whosoever will.”  Whether a young child, or a down and out adult, the invitation is still the same.  Jesus said in Matthew 11:28: “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” And in 19:14: “But Jesus said, Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven.”   Whether it is here at home or on foreign soil: “Come to Jesus.”  Rich, poor, famous or infamous, healthy or not healthy: “Come to Jesus.”  The invitation is open for all.

It is the Lord who has initiated the call to you and I to be “sent” and to take His message to a needing world.  Are you participating in the evangelism opportunities of your local church?  Are you praying for and giving finances to missions?  Are you willing to go if the Lord calls you to vocational missions?

Let the words of Jesus resonate in your mind: “Even so send I you…