Tag Archives: reading

Making the Teacher Happy

Making the Teacher Happy

And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man. Luke 2:52

It makes sense to me.  Want good grades?  Want to not earn demerits?  Want to not be punished by your parents for wrong doing while at school?  Then make it a goal to “make the teacher happy.”

Don’t get this wrong.  Just about every week, the news tells us about impropriety and immorality between a teacher and student.  That is not how to make the teacher happy.  Making the teacher happy in the sense of gaining their favor in the classroom is something that should be expected.  Earning the esteem and admiration of the teacher should be like “second nature” to a student.

Here are some ideas to gain the favor of the teacher, earn good grades, and to become a more complete boy or girl for Jesus.  Parents, these are expectations you should have for your son/daughter.

  1. Work on your attitude. A student with a good attitude can do anything and become anyone that God wants him to be.  A student with a rotten attitude will not be able to achieve all God wants – because of the bad attitude.  As a parent, this is the most important area to work on.  If an attitude is demanding, selfish, reluctant, pushy, sarcastic, or manipulative, then the student is heading for a disastrous life unless there is an intervention.  Parents, work together with the teacher to remedy the attitude.  Rules do not make a bad attitude – a rebellious heart makes a bad attitude.  Attitude is a choice of the heart – not the circumstances. Proverbs 23:7 says, “For as he thinketh in his heart, so is he.”  And Jesus said in Matthew 15:18, “But those things which proceed out of the mouth come forth from the heart; and they defile the man.”  The attitude, good or bad, is a reflection of the heart.
  2. Know the score. Each student should know what is expected in each class.  Jr High and Sr High school students rotate between classes and teachers and there will be variations of expectations in each class.  The student should learn each nuance and expectation and adjust accordingly.  If the student does not know what is expected, he should ask for clarification.  For example: One teacher may want the student to sit more straight in the chair, while another teacher looks for the students name to be printed on the top right (instead of to the left) of an assignment.
  3. Think before you speak. The classroom interaction should remain positive and encouraging.  When a teacher corrects a child, it is not the same thing as disciplining a child.  For example: a student is disrupting the class and talking out of turn.  When the teacher says: “Stop talking” – she has offered correction – not punishment.  The embarrassment of being called out may impact the student, but no discipline has happened. If the student talks back by giving an excuse for disobeying the rules, then he should be punished for acting and speaking the rebellion in his heart.  Demerits and detention are examples of punishment.  When correction is noted and told the parent and when actually discipline talks place in school, I believe it is best that the parents follows up with their own personal discipline and punishment at home.  Students misbehaving at school are a reflection of the parenting, or lack of parenting in the home. Parents are advised to train their children to “think before they speak.”
  4. Respect everyone. A student does not have to understand a rule, just agree to live by it.  Institutional rules are not intended to be morally right or wrong, but to give order and structure to the organization.  Disobeying a rule is morally wrong, even when the rule has no moral bearing.  A majority of rules in a school have to do with respecting other people.  In this era of education, most people are focused on individual rights.  Surprisingly, some Christians have also adopted this humanistic philosophy.  The Bible and traditional education is more focused on the rights of others.  For example, an clothing outfit that is distracting to others is ruled against in order to not interfere with the learning of the other students.  Another example – talking and disrupting class with sarcastic remarks is not allowed so that other students are able to focus on their studies.  Teach your student to be considerate of others when he comes to the classroom.
  5. Expect more. Many parents allow their child to talk back, complain until the parent changes his mind, and even manipulate the decisions of the parents with emotional instability, constant nagging, and a persistent bad attitude.  I encourage you to expect more and demand less.  Expect more of a submissive attitude and demand less negative talking.  When complaining starts – stop it. When a sour expression glosses over the face – stop it.  Expect more. When teachers and others in authority inform there is a problem – get to the root of the problem – the heart.  Defending a student, making up excuses, or taking sides will not help develop the heart of the student for the Lord.  Dross is never removed from the gold until the heat is applied.  Just like gold, a student will not be worth much in life if all the dross and impurities of a bad attitude and selfish life are removed.  It is ultimately the student’s choice, but a parent, like the goldsmith, can make a big difference.
  6. Honor God. Each student wanting to honor the Lord willingly submits to the authority and the education the Lord has called him to.  While a student may not have a “paying” job, the Lord has called each student to the “full time job” of learning.  It is hard work to focus, pay attention to detail, write papers, and study for tests.  Being a student is a “Calling” with lifelong implications and dividends.  If a student does not develop good study habits, personal disciplining relationships with authority and peers, and make decisions that honor God while in his youth – it is much harder to learn it later in life.  Thank the Lord for many who have been saved, or saved people who have been restored to fellowship later in life.  But think of the years wasted, the relationships ruined, and the witness for Christ diminished during that time.  Help your student to honor God today.

By the Way:  The Jewish boys would become a “son of the commandment” at age 13.  In the years before age 13, the parents would do all they could to help the boy mature and develop into a respectable and responsible young man.  That is the context of Jesus “increasing in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man.”  Mary and Joseph taught their boys before age 13 to put God first in their lives.  Parents, you do not have much time to help your student learn to “Be” and to “Do” right.

Learn to make your teacher happy. It will cause your educational years to be both enjoyable and productive.

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Readers Are Leaders

“Readers are Leaders”

The cloke that I left at Troas with Carpus, when thou comest, bring with thee, and the books, but especially the parchments.  2 Timothy 4:13

“Readers are Leaders” It is a thoughtful statement.  As learned as Paul was, he continued to read the Bible (Parchments) and books.  This is a good example for us today.  The Bible teaches us to continually grow spiritually, personally, relationally, and professionally.  Reading is a good way to accomplish this.  Make sure you are “especially” reading the Bible.  In addition, here are several suggestions for your library.  In a day of disclosures, please note: While recommended, not everything may be endorsed.

 

General:

The Calvary Road, Hession

I Am a Church Member, Rainer

Church Still Works,  Chappell & Reed

The Pastor in Prayer, Spurgeon

Be Committed, Weirsbe

The Power of His Presence, Rogers

How God Answers Prayers, Towns

Key Words in the Christian Life, Wiersbe

Understanding the Times, Ham

The Plan B Prayer, Zacharias

 

Marriage:

A Firm Foundation, Chappell

A Faith Full Marriage, Chappell

The Right Romance in Marriage, Rice

The Love Dare, Kendrick

How to Save Your Marriage Alone, Wheat

Christian Living in the Home, Adams

The Five Love Languages, Chapman

The Christian Home, Sexton

Making Home Work, Chappell

Live Lighter, Love Better, Schmidt

The Love Dare Day by Day, Kendrick

 

Retirees:

Fourth Quarter, Sisk

How Do You Feel Today, Harness

 

Parenting:

Basics of Biblical Parenting, Chappell

Do You Mind If Your Kids Don’t, Rice

Shepherding a Child’s Heart, Tripp

 

Ladies:

The Choice is Yours, Chappell

A Joyful Heart, Gibbs

Wisdom from Women in the Bible, Maxwell

 

Men:

The Steps of a Good Man, Sisk

Lest You Fall, Hummell

Turn Away Wrath, Hummell

One Being a Servant of God, Wiersbe

Living Beyond Your Capacity, Chappell

Learning From The Giants, Maxwell

Great Hunting Stories, Chapman

 

Teens:

Discover Your Destiny, Schmidt

Just Friends, Mike Ray & Cary Schmidt

Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Learn for Teens, Maxwell

Money Matters for Teens, Burkett & Wooding

Boyhood and Beyond: Practical Steps to Becoming a Man, Schultz

 

Young Adults:

Boundaries in Dating, Cloud & Townshend

Before the Ring, Coleman

Starting Out Right, Burkett

 

Finances:

How to Manage Your Money, Larry Burkett

Giving & Tithing, Larry Burkett

Never Enough?,  Blue & Guess

 

What book are you currently reading?

What book has helped you in your Christian life the most that you read in the last year?

Please leave your encouraging comments.

Starting the New Year Right

This article was posted a year ago but is still helpful to those heading to school in the next few days.

Starting the New School Year Right

The thoughts of the diligent tend only to plenteousness; but of every one that is hasty only to want.  Proverbs 21:5

You may enjoy this humorous story as much as I did:  “A college freshman was giving her friend a tour of the college she attended. She pointed out the various recreational sights in the area and the numerous places for eating out. When they returned to the dorm, the freshman reminded her visiting friend that they needed to be quiet because her roommates were studying. Before they entered the room she whispered to her friend, “All they do is study. Honestly, I don’t even know why they came to college.””  (Ministry127)

It was Francis Bacon who said: “Crafty men condemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them.”  We must be wise in our approach to the new school year.  Thinking and planning ahead is commended in the Scripture.  The person who is diligent in his thoughts will have results that end in plenty.  Nearly all of us would want not only “passing grades” but “excelling grades” for each class we take!

Apply this truth of diligence to the education department of your life and you can learn how to become successful in your pursuit of learning in this new school year.  Go for more than an “A+.”  These truths can work no matter if you are entering kindergarten or college.

Whether a student or a parent of a student, this list will help you think through the start of the new year to enable you to “Start the New School Year Right.”

  • Have a Good Attitude. Attitude is of paramount importance as you plan for a new school year.  Whether you have 0 or 15 years of schooling, each year is new and different.  There can be some intimidation that comes with new teachers, new subjects, and new classmates.  Speak with enthusiasm about the new school year.  Talk openly of fears, then resolve to have Bible faith to face those fears and move past them.  Avoid those who speak ill of teachers, class, or school.  Don’t listen to them.   Focus on the positives and be consistent to speak often of the great potential for learning and growing.  Good attitudes are reflected in our words and actions.  Your effort in studies is affected by your attitude.  Have a good attitude and purpose to look forward to each school day.
  • Have Personal Discipline. Leave early for class.  If school starts at 8:10 AM.  Plan to arrive at 8:00 AM.  If it takes you 20 minutes to drive to school, leave 30 minutes early.  Much of the hasty, rushing feeling and frustration on the first day can be avoided by being more disciplined with your time and when you actually leave the house or dorm room to make it to class.
  • Have a Healthy Breakfast. You have heard that “breakfast is the most important meal of the day.”  Not only does it help maintain metabolism and even fights against obesity, breakfast can stimulate the mind and get the “thinking juices” going after a night of sleep and “fasting.”  Breaking the fast is important to the developing mind and body.  Inattentiveness, sleepiness and attitudes are all affected in a positive way when a healthy breakfast has been enjoyed.
  • Have a Devotional Time. Take a few moments to pray for each day to be the best day of this school year.  Read some Scripture and meditate on the Bible verses you have read to help encourage you and to guide your learning ethic and relational skills throughout the school day.  Dedicate your pursuit of learning to the Lord each day.
  • Have a Flexible Spirit. Not everything will go as planned.  That is all right!  God is still in control and He will help you through each day.  Things will come up that delay you, sidetrack you, and even slow you down from reaching your daily goals.  If you stop and focus on the distractions, then you will not achieve the learning that you need for that day.  Be flexible, and then learn how to refocus.

Those who rush thoughtlessly to the classroom may make a passing grade, but they may not learn all that they could have if they do not have these principles guiding them.  Many people come up short in knowledge because they do not think, plan, and execute their plan for success in the classroom.

You can do better than merely get a good grade on paper.  Ask the Lord to help you start the new school year right.  Then go on to have the best year in school that you have ever had!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why A Christian School?

Why A Christian School?

Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful.  Psalm 1:1

 

The idea of education is rooted in Biblical principles.  Many schools throughout history were started with the purpose of teaching children to read so that in turn, they could read the Word of God.  The “primers” were portions of Scripture used to teach reading.  From age 4 to 18 years much of a child’s time is spent being taught in a classroom.  This time is an investment and not a waste.  Since so much time is invested in education, it is a good idea to have a plan, and use Bible principles to guide us.

During the Dark Ages, many people could not read and the world was steeped in a dark period of time because of a lack of knowledge.  Bible reading gives more than just knowledge; when believed and acted upon the Bible is the very wisdom of God for living.  The Bible is intended to help us walk, stand, and sit throughout the course of life.

As a Pastor and local church, we value students and families no matter what educational venue they choose.  At the same time, it is important to consider why we would participate in a local church day school.  FYI: I attended government school for 12 years and later a Christian College.  Christian education in a church-school setting is more than just an alternative to a homeschool, private academy, or large government classroom.  It is more.

Why a Christian school?  Because education is more than merely learning – it is who you are learning from and what you are learning that makes the difference.

Here are several thoughts to consider:

The Curriculum Connection.

If the primary goal of education is to be able to read the Bible, then a curriculum founded upon Bible truth should be utilized in the education of a child.  The paradigm with which a textbook delivers lessons is very critical to the academic, philosophical, and spiritual development of the mind of each student.  If a parent or instructor constantly needs to “correct” the lessons of a curriculum, it causes a distrust or uncertainty in the mind of the student.

With a Christian school, curriculum is chosen that is written from a Bible perspective. The Lord is God, He created this world, He loves us and He has given us a Book, the Bible that has the answers we need for life.  While church and Sunday School are good places to learn doctrine, it can only aid a child that the lessons at school are informed by faith as well.  In many cases, secular curriculum discounts truth.  For example, several civics classes are teaching moral and social revolution.  In many texts history is re-written to conform to what is politically correct rather than what is true history.

At Wilton Baptist Academy, are pleased to use the ABeka curriculum consistently through the entire school.  This is a grade “A” curriculum rooted in God’s Word.  The world-view is Christian, the doctrine is baptistic, and the level of academic expectation is excellence.

The Excellence of Expectations.  

  • Academic Expectations. Some institutions are slacking in effort.  I was speaking to a student from another school recently who said the teacher divides up the class between those who “want to try” today and those who “do not want to try.”  In other cases, students report that they “study when they want to” or “attend class when they feel like it.”

When we aim for nothing we are bound to hit it every time.  Even with rigorous expectations, not every student will make straight A’s.  Good grades are not expected as much as the “best effort possible.”  Much of the effort and attitude to try is developed by the parent.

  • Attitude Expectations. A bad attitude hurts in many ways.  “You cannot teach a rebel.”  The reason is; his heart is not willing to learn.  As a school, if the attitude is constantly against school, curriculum, assignments, or the teacher, that student may be dismissed.  Education in general is not a right – it is a privilege.  No person deserves to “be in the know” or to learn.  Contrary to popular culture, in societies of old, the student had to want to learn in order to improve his life.  Classes in old days were sought out, funded, and paid for by people who wanted to learn.  This attitude and desire totally changes the classroom setting.  Coming to class expecting to learn is a refreshing way to start the day at school.
  • Appreciation Expectations. Not everyone is taught truth.  Millions of people are taught evolution which is a lie.  This theory has been believed by many with “religious conviction.”  However, the Bible, written by God, Who was there at Creation, tells us how this world began.  God and faith are being removed from the history told concerning the motivation for events in history.  Even in math, some schools are teaching there is no absolute answer to 2+2= 4.  Appreciation for an environment of learning centered on truth should never be taken for granted or minimized.  This could also be considered a “Spiritual Expectation,” because spiritual people and people that are right with God are thankful people.

The Parental Priority. 

If a student is allowed to maintain a bad attitude in the home, he will not be a “learning machine” at school.  Proverbs 6:20-21 says, “My son, keep thy father’s commandment, and forsake not the law of thy mother: Bind them continually upon thine heart, and tie them about thy neck.”  School is to assist the parent in their parental obligation to guide the thinking of the adolescent child.

No matter what educational venue is chosen, schools do not “produce” successful students that are able to go into the world – parents do.  Schools may prepare for college academics; but they cannot prepare for daily life living in a college dorm setting.  The parents have the primary responsibility to prepare their children for daily life.  A school assists in the academic development of the child.  The school offers a good place for the child to practice spiritual and social disciplines learned from dad and mom; interacting with others and finding ways to serve and encourage others.  For example, we have “student service days” in which students are given opportunities to help the elderly, minster in the church, or write cards to hurting people.  The school can provide outlets for social, emotional, and spiritual growth.  However, the parent is called to nurture, expect, and facilitate true growth and life preparation. The school is a partner in academics and gives a place to practice what is taught at home; spiritually, emotionally, and relationally.

Ultimately, the student who goes on to serve the Lord, hold down a job, and fulfill a lifetime marriage commitment is no credit to the school but to the parents.  (Also note that many kids overcome terrible home environments to become faithful to the Lord in spite of their upbringing.)  Any student, who fails in their next step, can’t hold a job, or even rejects serving the Lord, is a reflection of their personal rejection of the moral and religious training in the home.  Perhaps the student was taught right but the parent lost the heart of the child.  Proverbs 23:26 instructs, “My son, give me thine heart, and let thine eyes observe my ways.” If a student is a rebel at heart, he will not embrace what he is being taught.  The priority then of parenting is to “obtain the heart of the child.”  Without the child’s love, admiration, and respect, the parent loses long-term influence.  “To whom much is given much is required.”  In this case the student is given much in opportunity, but refuses to accept what he is given.  While the school cannot take credit; it also cannot take the blame for the perceived “failures” either.   Before one would criticize that statement wait until you read this: “The story of your child’s life is not fully written.”  Children who rebel can come back to serve God.  Students who graduate and start out serving the Lord could turn away from Him later in life.  It happens.  At some point, the parenting stops and the responsibility solely falls on the adult child.  Paul said: “By the grace of God I am what I am.”  That is true for any faithful adult as well.

The parent is tasked with training their child to the best of their ability to be able to leave the home, stand on their own two feet financially, stop borrowing the faith of others (have faith on their own), care for others in service, and have the character to live righteously while in community with God’s people.  Parents are to “shoot their arrow” out from the quiver of the home and that “arrow” will be planted in the place he lands.

That is what Psalm 1:2-3, the next two verses, teach:  “But his delight is in the law of the LORD; and in his law doth he meditate day and night.  And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.”

The student is to grow to such a level that what he does following his formative education years is prospered by the Lord.  He is firmly planted by his home upbringing, prepared academically for the next level of learning, and he does not fade away from the responsibilities that accompany adulthood.  The response of the child to the parental guidance and education in the classroom is solely that of the child.  He will answer for his willingness or refusal to learn and grow.  The priority of the parent is to have the “heart” of their child.  Part of the Christian school mission then is to direct the heart of the child back to the parent.

A Christian school can potentially help you and your student. Why A Christian School?  Because education is more than merely learning – it is who you are learning from and what you are learning that makes the difference.